Simple Home Repair Tips To Prepare For An Alzheimer’s Patient
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Caring for a loved one suffering with Alzheimer’s disease can be highly rewarding, but it can also be overwhelming, especially in the beginning as you start to think about changes you’ll need to make in order to keep them safe. There are many details to keep in mind, but fortunately there are also several tips available on how to complete small or simple upgrades and repairs to your home that will ensure your loved one is healthy and happy.

The best way to start is to go from room to room in the home and write down potential hazards or changes you know you want to make. Here are some tips to get you started.

Bathroom

Because Alzheimer’s strikes the elderly, it’s a good idea to start by thinking about physical safety. The bathroom is one of the most dangerous places in the home for an older individual, so you might begin by acquiring a soft faucet cover, a shower chair and rail, and a non-slip mat. It’s also a good idea to check your hot water heater and make sure the temperature is normal, and remove the door locks or install a chain lock that will be easy to cut should you need to help them.

Photo via Pixabay by midascode

Photo via Pixabay by midascode

Kitchen

The kitchen can also be a dangerous place, but considering it’s one of the most popular gathering places in the home, it’s important to make sure it’s safe and comfortable. Chairs should have non-slip tabs on the bottom and there should be no loose rugs that could be tripped over. Consider buying a stove that has removable knobs, and always keep at least one fire extinguisher nearby.

Bedroom

Baby monitors are wonderful tools when caring for a loved one living with Alzheimer’s, especially if it is in advanced stages. Having a way for them to be heard should they need assistance is invaluable.

Curtains are preferable over blinds for the windows, as long cords can be safety hazards. Ensure that dressers and heavy furniture are anchored to the walls, and apply pieces of foam or other soft material to the legs of the bed to prevent injuries to toes.

Living areas

Remove clutter from any walkways and make sure there are no trip hazards. It’s a good idea to consider whether your loved one might need precautions against wandering, such as motion-sensor alarms. Lock up any dangerous items, such as knives or weapons, and install childproof latches on drawers and cupboards that contain things your loved one shouldn’t have access to.

Keep all walkways well-lit and maintained. Night lights can be helpful in bathrooms and in the kitchen for nighttime use. If necessary, close off stairwells to keep your loved one from suffering falls.

Outdoors

Motion-sensor lights are a good idea for outside areas, especially if you have a pool or hot tub or if there is a lot of furniture that could cause a fall. Always keep pool areas covered and locked up, and put away all pool-related equipment after use.

Lock up any tools or machinery, and if you have a shed or detached garage make sure there is a sturdy door with a lock on it.

While these are all certainly great repairs to make for your loved one, it’s important that if you decide to make any of them yourself that you practice DIY safety. Wear the proper protective gear and make sure you know how to handle tools properly. And don’t be afraid to call on a professional when you need one.

Taking care of a loved one who is living with Alzheimer’s can be difficult at times, but it’s important to remember that safety is the number one priority. Making sure your loved one is comfortable and has their needs met will ensure they have healthy, happy days.


Caroline James is passionate about fighting for senior mental health and support. Caroline and her husband createdElder Action after becoming caregivers for their aging parents, with the aim of providing useful information to aging seniors.

Written by Guest Author
The Caregiver Space accepts contributions from experts for The Caregiver's Toolbox and provides a platform for all caregivers in Caregiver Stories. Please read our author guidelines for more information and use our contact form to submit guest articles.

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