Long miles, lonely roads: In rural Texas, dying at home means little is easy

HASKELL COUNTY, Texas – To get to the house where Shawn Jordan wants to die, you drive a hypnotic road along miles of furrowed cotton fields, gnarly mesquite trees, low-to-the-ground cactus, and cattle perpetually in search of food. This iconic land of open spaces and oil pumps, where the Panhandle meets west Texas, is where the…


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4 Comments

  1. When my dad went through hospice the night time hospice support person had to cover 3 counties. My dad fell one night and we called hospice… the guy said it would take him 2+ hours to get to us. Dad gasping for air on the floor… we couldn’t lift him… absolutely terrifying. We called family friends who could come help us in the middle of the night… we lived in Champaign Il. Understaffed hospice program… one of the worst memories of a very emotional time.

    Reply
  2. When my dad went through hospice the night time hospice support person had to cover 3 counties. My dad fell one night and we called hospice… the guy said it would take him 2+ hours to get to us. Dad gasping for air on the floor… we couldn’t lift him… absolutely terrifying. We called family friends who could come help us in the middle of the night… we lived in Champaign Il. Understaffed hospice program… one of the worst memories of a very emotional time.

    Reply
  3. That’s exactly how my husband became a hospice chaplain. A pastor in very rural NoDakota, he didn’t want folks to die away from their loved ones in city hospitals and thus, started rural hospices. He’s been a hospice chaplain almost 20 years now and still loves his work.

    Reply
  4. That’s exactly how my husband became a hospice chaplain. A pastor in very rural NoDakota, he didn’t want folks to die away from their loved ones in city hospitals and thus, started rural hospices. He’s been a hospice chaplain almost 20 years now and still loves his work.

    Reply

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