seniors can stay social and keep learning when they use the internet

When disabilities or memory impairment make going out more difficult, seniors can feel like they’re not able to do the things they love anymore. Going online can help them stay social, learn new things, and have fun without the hassle of going out.

That is, of course, if they can navigate the internet!

Here are some tools to help seniors get online, stay safe, and have a good time — giving us time to get some things done or maybe even have a few moments of peace and quiet!


Skills to get started

If your senior is able to attend classes in person, check with SeniorNet or your local library to see if they offer services to help people get online. If not, there are online classes and videos you can help them access.

Skillful Senior

This great website helps seniors learn the computer skills that feel like second nature to us — like using a mouse — that can be difficult to get a hang of.

skillful senior mouse skills

Webwise

The BBC created Webwise as a beginner’s guide to the internet. It starts with computer basics, walks you through email, introduces users to the internet, and helps guide seniors through the basics of social media. It even explains how to stay safe online. This is a great resource.

bbc web wise teaches computer skills, how to use the web, and social media basics

Senior Planet

Senior Planet’s tech tips section is an always-up-to-date source for information on the latest tech trends, apps, and tools.

senior planet's tech tips for making the most of getting online

A friendlier experience

Microsoft Accessibility

If you’re helping set up a computer for someone with visual or hearing impairments or trouble typing, this site will walk you through adjustments you can make so they can have an easier time navigating the web.

Good50

Clear out the clutter of typical search engines and direct your senior to Good50 instead. They’ll get the same results with an easier navigation experience.

Eldy & Maavis

Clear away the clutter of a typical PC interface and replace it with something designed to be intuitive for seniors.

Written by Allison Powell
I live off of food from Trader Joe's. I spend my life in a cubicle, a la Office Space. I'm kind of obsessed with the internet. Confession: I take care of people but don't identify as a caregiver.

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1 Comment

  1. I gave my Mom an ipad and taught her Facebook and Alpha-Betty. WOW she took to it quickly

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