Mosaic Science

Mosaic is a magazine dedicated to exploring the science of life. Each week, we publish an in-depth story on the people, ideas and trends that drive biology and medicine and affect our lives, health and society. Mosaic is published by the Wellcome Trust, a global charitable foundation dedicated to improving health. Mosaic is editorially independent, covering subjects that fit with the Trust’s mission and vision, but isn’t limited to research that the Trust funds. Mosaic’s contributors bring their own unique perspectives to their stories, which means that the views expressed do not necessarily represent the views of the Wellcome Trust.
When you have a serious hereditary disease, who has a right to know?

When you have a serious hereditary disease, who has a right to know?

Genetic diagnosis is getting ever more sophisticated. But as doctors uncover diseases that are hereditary, who needs to know? Shaun Raviv explores the rights – and duties – of doctors, patients and families. In 2007, a middle-aged British man shot and killed his wife....

The Alzheimer’s enigma

The Alzheimer’s enigma

The cause of Alzheimer’s disease has troubled the science world’s best detectives. Michael Regnier asks: can such a mystery really be solved if we gather enough clues? The King of Crete demanded that, to atone for the death of his son, the city of Athens send him...

How much does it hurt?

How much does it hurt?

Aching, throbbing, searing, excruciating – pain is difficult to describe and impossible to see. So how can doctors measure it? John Walsh finds out about new ways of assessing the agony. Listen to or download an audiobook of this story...

A surprisingly good place to die

A surprisingly good place to die

A campaigning doctor has helped make Mongolia a better place to die than many much wealthier nations. Andrew North met her to find out how. What comes to mind when you think of Mongolia? My answer, probably like many people’s, was vast empty space, those signature...

Psychosis in Parkinson’s

Psychosis in Parkinson’s

Now we can treat it without making other symptoms worse Half of people with Parkinson’s disease experience hallucinations, paranoia and delusions. Mary O’Hara reports on a new hope. One night without warning, Jay Sagen leapt from his bed and grabbed the quilt, then...

Healing the divide

Healing the divide

Every day, hundreds of Israeli volunteers drive ill Palestinians from the West Bank and the Gaza Strip to hospitals in Israel. Shaul Adar joins them on the road and learns why they see their neighbourly help as a step on the journey to peaceful coexistence. At 6.30am,...

How should you grieve?

How should you grieve?

The pain and sorrow of bereavement is supposed to get easier to bear as time passes. But what if it doesn’t? Psychiatrists call it 'complicated grief' – and it can be treated. Andrea Volpe reports. After Stephanie Muldberg’s 13-year-old son Eric died of Ewing’s...

Life with Li–Fraumeni syndrome

Life with Li–Fraumeni syndrome

Sue Armstrong meets Pan Pantziarka, whose son George had Li–Fraumeni syndrome and lived with cancer from early childhood. One of the bleakest moments in Pan Pantziarka’s long struggle with Li–Fraumeni syndrome was when doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London...

Breaking bad news

Breaking bad news

How do you tell someone that they’re seriously ill, or even dying? Chrissie Giles explores how doctors learn and how they deal with the stress and trauma, for both their patients and themselves. Listen to or download an audiobook of this story...

The man with the golden blood

The man with the golden blood

Meet the donors, patients, doctors and scientists involved in the complex global network of rare – and very rare – blood. Listen to or download an audiobook of this story on SoundCloud and iTunes. His doctor drove him over the border. It was quicker that way: if the...

Raising my HIV family

Raising my HIV family

When one Romanian doctor became ‘father’ to 16 HIV-positive orphans in 1999, many thought there was no hope for them – or for the thousands of other children infected. What followed was something of a miracle. Geta Roman tells their story. Dr Paul Marinescu has chosen...

Don't see what you're looking for? Search the library

Popular categories

Finances
Burnout
After Caregiving
Housing
Relationships
Finding Meaning
Planning
Dying
Finding Support
Work
Grief