11 Tips for taking care of someone with Dementia/Alzheimer’s
picture of pencil on a crossword puzzle

What are some activities for dementia and Alzheimer’s patients that have worked for you?

  1. Teepa Snow.” – Julie R. teepa-snow

  2. “As Dad remained quite mobile, one of my favourite activities to do with him was to go for walks together. Another common pastime was reading out loud to him, something he did for my sisters and me as a former University English Professor.” – Rick L.
    silhouette of elderly man with cane walking

  3. “Traveling the world on Google Earth.” – Alicia W.picture of a pile of mini globes

  4. “Making short videos on my computer and singing or just saying ‘hi’ to people.” – Katie S.picture of man skyping and waving hand

  5. “Soft sing alongs worked beautifully for my mother. She engaged and tried to sing. I even brought the Episcopal church hymnal with me once and flipped through the pages to remind me of her favorite hymns.” – Molly D.old woman clapping with her young granddaughter

  6. “Something he did as a young boy – marbles, checkers, or cards.” – Kim R.close up of a colorful set of marbles

  7. “Sorting – nuts, bolts, coins.” – Sandra O.shutterstock_280535489

  8. “Assembling something.” – Rhonda M.minimalist image of colorful building blocks

  9. “Mom likes current events or crossword puzzles.” – Julie H.closeup of crossword puzzle

  10. “With the help of a home aide, my father-in-law and I worked for months to create a rug for his great grandaughter Ava. When we brought out the materials, he became fully aware of his surroundings and why he was making it.” – Bobbi C.picture of great grandaughter with mom and great grandfather

  11. “When my father-in-law’s memory was faltering, we’d take him for a drive in the country to see a wind farm. This unusual ‘field trip’ garnered Dad’s attention. ‘There are so many windmills!’ he’d exclaim. “And they’re all so big!” – Harriet H.image of windmills in a field

Photo credit of Teepa Snow via Alzlive

Written by Liz Imler
As our Community Manager, Liz focuses on The Caregiver Space's daily online happenings. She also works behind the scenes, fixing bugs and making sure the site delivers our members a clean and seamless community experience. Before coming onto The Caregiver Space, Liz served as a Community Manager in the health and finance industries. She holds an MA from New York University and a BA from George Mason University, and splits her time between Virginia and New York. Her passions include writing, music, and travel.

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4 Comments

    • I have, She has Word Search and Jigsaw puzzles. She will also do some Crocheting. The walks we do but I’m not so sure she enjoys them 🙂

      Reply
    • We don’t always enjoy the things that are good for us, do we?

      Reply
  1. Aww….these people are so loving and sweet, bless them. I wish I had been able to do such nice things. alas.

    Reply

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